A.k.a. Evan Hunter, a.k.a. Ed McBain: an interview with the author of The Blackboard Jungle and 87th


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Under the Hunter name, novels steadily appeared throughout the s, s, and early s, including Come Winter and Lizzie Hunter was also successful as screenwriter for film and television. He wrote the screenplay for the Hitchcock film The Birds , loosely adapted from Daphne du Maurier's eponymous novelette.

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In the process of adapting Winston Graham's novel Marnie for Hitchcock, Hunter and the director disagreed on the rape scene, and the writer was sacked. Hunter's other screenplays included Strangers When We Meet , based on his own novel; and Fuzz , based on his eponymous 87th Precinct novel, which he had written as Ed McBain. From until his death, McBain's 87th Precinct novels appeared at a rate of approximately one or two novels a year.

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From to , McBain published a series about lawyer Matthew Hope; books in this series appeared every year or two, and usually had titles derived from well-known children's stories. For about a decade, from to , Hunter published no fiction under his own name. In , a novel called Candyland appeared that was credited to both Hunter and McBain.

The two-part novel opened in Hunter's psychologically-based narrative voice before switching to McBain's customary police procedural style. Aside from McBain, Hunter used at least two other pseudonyms for his fiction after Doors , which was originally attributed to Ezra Hannon, before being reissued as a work by McBain, and Scimitar , which was credited to John Abbott. Hunter gave advice to other authors in his article, "Dig in and get it done: In it, he advised authors to "find their voice for it is the most important thing in any novel". A heavy smoker for many decades, Hunter had three heart attacks over a number of years his first in and was found to have a precancerous lesion on his larynx in This was removed, but the problem later returned, and Hunter died from laryngeal cancer in , aged 78, in Weston, Connecticut..

Your comments and feedback are always welcome. Collection of 25 stories including intros by McBain himself from the fifties show the writer in fine form, spinning hard-boiled of alcoholic dicks and other losers, plus one of the all-time great P. Memoirs of his experience with director Alfed Hithcock, working on The Birds. McBain reviews Robert B. Parker's completion of Raymond Chandler's "Poodle Springs" and tags it "a rattling good mystery. Part of the Times' "Writers on Writing" series. An illuminating glimpse at McBain's early days writing for the crime digests. An astounding labour of love and scholarship , as MacDonald, not content with spending seven years kicking the can around on a dissertation on the 87th Precinct novels, wades into the vast ocean of work McBain left us, from short stories in the pulps and digests to his bestselling police procedurtals and crime novels.

Detailed overviews and an impressive listing of character-by-character breakdowns, plus oodles of bibliographic info make this an essential reference work for both fans and collectors, both encyclopedic and engaging. Respectfully submitted and awaiting tons of corrections, I'm sure by Kevin Burton Smith. A Literary Companion is just absolutely some kind of wonderful. Not all of these are crime novels, and some of them may be alternative titles.

Buy this book Ax ; 87th Precinct.. Buy this book He Who Hesitates ; 87th Precinct.. Buy this book Doll ; 87th Precinct.. Buy this book Rumpelstiltskin ; Matthew Hope.. Buy this book Ice ; 87th Precinct.. Buy this book Mary, Mary ; Matthew Hope.. Buy this book The Last Dance ; 87th Precinct. Buy this book Driving Lessons Buy this book Money, Money, Money ; 87th Precinct. Buy this book The Frumious Bandersnatch ; 87th Precinct..

Buy this book Hark! Buy this book Fiddlers ; 87th Precinct Buy this book Learning to Kill Buy this book Collection of 25 stories including intros by McBain himself from the fifties show the writer in fine form, spinning hard-boiled of alcoholic dicks and other losers, plus one of the all-time great P.

Evan Hunter on The Birds ending

She Was in Trouble. This experience would later form the basis for his novel Blackboard Jungle , written under the pen name Evan Hunter. Clarke , Lester del Rey , Richard S. Prather , and P. He made his first professional short story sale that same year, a science-fiction tale titled "Welcome, Martians!

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a.k.a. Evan Hunter, a.k.a. Ed McBain: an interview with the author of "The Blackboard Jungle" and 87th Precinct mystery series - Kindle edition by Dale Andrew. a.k.a. Evan Hunter, a.k.a. Ed McBain: an interview with the author of "The Blackboard Jungle" and 87th Precinct mystery series eBook: Dale Andrew White: .

The name Evan Hunter is generally believed to have been derived from two schools he attended, Evander Childs High School and Hunter College, although the author himself would never confirm that. He did confirm that Hunt Collins was derived from Hunter College. Lombino legally changed his name to Evan Hunter in May , after an editor told him that a novel he wrote would sell more copies if credited to Evan Hunter than to S. Thereafter, he used the name Evan Hunter both personally and professionally.

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As Evan Hunter, he gained notice with his novel Blackboard Jungle dealing with juvenile crime and the New York City public school system. The film adaptation followed in During this era, Hunter also wrote a great deal of genre fiction. He was advised by his agents that publishing too much fiction under the Hunter byline, or publishing any crime fiction as Evan Hunter, might weaken his literary reputation.

Consequently, during the s Hunter used the pseudonyms Curt Cannon, Hunt Collins, and Richard Marsten for much of his crime fiction. A prolific author in several genres, Hunter also published approximately two dozen science fiction stories and four science-fiction novels between and under the names S. Addams, and Ted Taine.

Ed McBain, his best known pseudonym, was first used with Cop Hater , the first novel in the 87th Precinct crime series. Hunter revealed that he was McBain in but continued to use the pseudonym for decades, notably for the 87th Precinct series, and the Matthew Hope detective series.

From then on crime novels were generally attributed to McBain and other sorts of fiction to Hunter. Reprints of crime-oriented stories and novels written in the s previously attributed to other pseudonyms were re-issued under the McBain byline.

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I'll be hunting down some more of McBain's gumshoe fiction, of that you can be assured. Please try again later. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime. One person found this helpful. One of the minor flaws of the novel is that the end comes very fast, almost too fast, and that the motives of the murderer are quite mundane.

Hunter stated that the division of names allowed readers to know what to expect: McBain novels had a consistent writing style, while Hunter novels were more varied. Under the Hunter name, novels steadily appeared throughout the s, s, and early s, including Come Winter and Lizzie Hunter was also successful as screenwriter for film and television. He wrote the screenplay for the Hitchcock film The Birds , loosely adapted from Daphne du Maurier 's eponymous novelette.

In the process of adapting Winston Graham 's novel Marnie for Hitchcock, Hunter and the director disagreed on the rape scene, and the writer was sacked.

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Hunter's other screenplays included Strangers When We Meet , based on his own novel; and Fuzz , based on his eponymous 87th Precinct novel, which he had written as Ed McBain. From until his death, McBain's 87th Precinct novels appeared at a rate of approximately one or two novels a year.

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From to , McBain published a series about lawyer Matthew Hope; books in this series appeared every year or two, and usually had titles derived from well-known children's stories. For about a decade, from to , Hunter published no fiction under his own name. In , a novel called Candyland appeared that was credited to both Hunter and McBain. The two-part novel opened in Hunter's psychologically-based narrative voice before switching to McBain's customary police procedural style. Aside from McBain, Hunter used at least two other pseudonyms for his fiction after Doors , which was originally attributed to Ezra Hannon, before being reissued as a work by McBain, and Scimitar , which was credited to John Abbott.

Hunter gave advice to other authors in his article, "Dig in and get it done: In it, he advised authors to "find their voice for it is the most important thing in any novel". Hunter has long been rumoured to have written an unknown number of pornographic novels, as Dean Hudson, for William Hamling's publishing houses.